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3 Steps to Captivating Content

You know captivating content when you see it. It’s something that causes an emotional response and resonates with you. It creates a connection, and makes you say, “I want to be part of that, and share with everyone I know!”

Captivating content is the mass email you get and look forward to. It’s the Super Bowl commercial everyone re-watches at work the next day. It’s the tagline you repeat. It’s the picture you print out. It’s the product you buy because of the package. Though it’s easy to identify, captivating content is generally not easy to create, but here are three things you can do to help get you there:

1.) Know Your Objective

What is the purpose of your content, and what do you hope to achieve with it? Obviously, you’re trying to generate more income, but how? Are you targeting current clients to invest more assets, or refer someone to you, or build a relationship with their family? Are you targeting prospects you’ve met or prospects you haven’t encountered? Are you trying to bring more people to your website or attain more email addresses?

List out each goal you’re trying to accomplish with each piece of content. It not only helps you create a clear message, but will also create a benchmark to track your success. Without an objective, how will you know if your message is working?

2.) Know Your Demographic

Who are you trying to reach with your content? Stay-at-home moms? Busy CEOs? Retired veterans? Married couples with grandchildren?

Figure out exactly who it is you want to see your content and make sure you’ve written and designed it to their preferences. For example, if you’re targeting an audience in their 60s, you’ll want to make sure the font you are using is large and clearly legible.

Knowing who you are targeting also helps you know where to place your content. Let’s say you were trying to reach the employees at the Nissan factory in your city. You could advertise on the billboard near the Nissan factory that they drive past every morning.

3.) Run It Past Someone Else

When you’re trying to come up with content ideas, it always helps to brainstorm with someone else with an outside perspective. It’s easy to get lost in the jargon and to take for granted the financial terms and knowledge you have. Financial concepts that seem juvenile to you may be foreign to someone outside of your field. That’s why it’s always important to get a second set of eyes on your work from someone who isn’t familiar with the ins and outs of your job.

To bring it all together, here’s an example of what it looks like:

Objective: Schedule meetings with prospective clients who need help managing their finances as they go through a divorce.

Demographic: Women going through a divorce or just recently divorced.

Content: An educational piece provided to local “divorce care” classes about the common financial mistakes that get overlooked after a divorce and how to avoid them with an invitation to reach out to your team for further help or to review their current plan.

Review and refine: Ask a client or spouse to review what you have for anything that doesn’t make sense then redesign or rewrite accordingly.

While we can’t promise that following these steps will guarantee you will be a viral sensation, we can promise that you’ll be closer to your goal than when you started.

For more tips on creating content and marketing visit KalliCollective.com, which is part of the FPA Member Discount Program.

Kalli Lipke

With nearly a decade of experience in the financial industry, along with securities licenses 7 & 63, Kalli Lipke not only understands the way your clients think, but how the financial industry operates. She helps financial planners bring their business to the next level through marketing and branding.


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Power and Pitfalls of Digital Marketing

Building a positive professional reputation is a journey. Fortunately, digital media marketing has facilitated this process. The rapid advancement of website development allows you to launch a professional and beautiful website quickly. Social media marketing enables you to push out coordinated messages across many social media platforms—LinkedIn, Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, etc. In addition, social media publishing websites like Hootsuite, allow you post on multiple platforms at once. Even more, people are now able to find you easily and quickly. The ubiquitous Google search reveals loads of information, and there’s the rub!

A 2018 Pershing study of investors revealed that one in three investors searched advisers on Facebook and over 50 percent decided to reject the adviser based on their personal Facebook, not their LinkedIn profile or their website. Wow! This is a sobering reminder that everything impacts your success. Even lack of presence affects your brand; not having a presence can be as damaging as having the wrong kind of presence.

I recall coaching a father and son team together. The father was actively resisting a digital presence. His son was unable to persuade him of the importance of having a digital brand. When I explained that having no digital presence was the same as having no business card, no brochure, no sign on the office door and no listing in the phone book, the father immediately became an enthusiastic devotee of digital marketing.

Given the power of the Internet to enhance (or diminish) your professional reputation, guidelines are helpful. I recommend the 3 D’s of digital communication: discreet, diplomatic and dignified.

Deeper Dive into the 3 D’s

Discreet: Discretion was revered at one time. It was considered boorish, rude and self-centered to endlessly disgorge personal details. This is particularly true for older clients and prospects. Discretion will only enhance your brand.

Diplomatic: Children are taught to be considerate and not hurt other people’s feelings. That’s diplomacy in a nutshell. Some clients will not care about your personal social and political views, but others will. Aim to be a Rorschach test. Allow them to interpret you, from their point of view. Everyone likes their viewpoint affirmed.

Dignified: Self-control, moderation and honorable behavior are hallmarks of being dignified. Dignity wraps us in a pleasant, peaceful and respectful aroma. Can you imagine if everything posted on the Internet was dignified? How delightful that would be!

The 3 D’s of communication protect your reputation from the damaging 3 I’s of the Internet, the mundane posts that are inane, the strident that are irritating and the belligerent that are insulting.

Resources for Planners

Since a major tenet of social media marketing is sharing valuable content, there is a great deal of good guidance available from industry experts. Start with the eye-opening Pershing study: “Advisor Value Propositions: How Advisors Showcase Their Value to Investors—and What Investors Secretly Think.”

Then ask peers and business advisers for more resources to build your brand. Five favorite resources recommended by marketing gurus include:

  1. Social media management: Hootesuite and top 6 alternatives for 2019
  2. DIY beautiful websites: WIX or SquareSpace
  3. Logo and marketing design: 99Designs
  4. Freelance marketplace for hiring pros: fiverr
  5. Self-publishing for e-books and print books: Amazon-owned Kindle Direct Publishing (formerly CreateSpace. Amazon merged KDP and CreateSpace in 2019.)

Feel free to check out the articles and tools at Barbara Kay Coaching. Even better, reach out and I’ll help you connect to the right resource for your interests.

BarbaraKay-headshot

Barbara Kay, LPC, RCC, president of Barbara Kay Coaching, is a business psychology and productivity expert who coaches and speaks nationwide. She specializes in growth, productivity, teams, clients, change, women and leadership. Joining the FPA Coaches Corner in 2019, she now offers free coaching to FPA members.


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Your Service, Your Story, Your Value

A financial planning practice must be able to articulate and demonstrate a planner’s value, story, service menu and deliverables—these remain the most fundamental elements of your business. After all, if you can’t convey and verbalize what you do, how will you attract people to your business and grow? And, if you don’t consistently deliver your value, how will you retain clients and sustain success? As we enter the fall, it is a good time to go back to the basics.

How well can you—and every team member regardless of role—answer the following fundamental questions?

Positioning: Who are You?

  1. What is your identity as a business? How does your community perceive who you are and what you do?
  2. Do you go beyond your title and firm name when someone asks you what you do for a living?
  3. Do you have a differentiating and intriguing story? Does each team member articulate a cohesive message?

Purpose: Why Do You Do What You Do?

  1. Why are you in this business?
  2. What is your vision? What is the team’s vision?
  3. Where are you leading the team? Where are you leading your clients?

Proposition: What Do You Offer and to Whom?

  1. Can you delineate the solutionsservices and deliverables that you offer to each client segment?
  2. What problems do you solve and for whom?
  3. What is your reactive service strategy? What is included in your proactive service matrix?
  4. How do you define and delineate the ultimate client experience?

Price: How Much Do You Charge for Your Deliverables?

  1. Do you consistently execute on your pricing model or are there more exceptions than standards?
  2. How transparent are you with pricing? Do your clients understand what they are paying and what they are receiving for that fee?

Process: How Do You Do What You Do?

  1. What is your defined process for working with prospects and clients and do you consistently execute it?
  2. Do your prospects have clear expectations on what they will experience when working with your team?
  3. How efficient and systemized is your business?

Differential: What Makes You Different?

  1. Can each team member answer the question, “Why should I do business with you?”

We recommend that you schedule quarterly off-site team sessions to focus on the strategic side of your financial planning practice. You should reflect and identify successes and challenges, and then look ahead and plan for the future. The questions listed above are a starting point. Consider the strength of your value today and what changes may need to take place as you head into the future.

Sarah E. Dale and Krista S. Sheets are partners at Performance Insights, where they focus on helping financial professionals increase results through wiser practice management and people decisions.