Leave a comment

Don’t Forget Clients’ Pets in Estate Planning

When Karl Lagerfeld passed away a few months ago, it brought renewed attention to estate planning for pets. The fashion designer left a chunk of his estimated $300 million net worth to Choupette, his beloved Birman cat.

Lagerfeld kept his furry companion in mind during estate planning, which other planners recommend your clients do, too.

“I have definitely recommended people taking certain steps planning for how their assets pass to make sure they take care of their pets,” Roger Ma, CFP®, recently told CBS News.

The 2017–2018 survey by the American Pet Products Association (APPA) found that 68 percent of U.S. households owned a pet. Pets are considered tangible property, like cars and furniture, so if your clients don’t leave a plan for their pet, it won’t be taken care of the way they want it to be.

Here are some things your clients can do to ensure proper care of their fur babies. Identify the pet’s new owner. Identify a person who can take care of the pet who actually wants to. Following this, leaving the pet to them could be done in a few ways.

Update the client’s will. It can be as simple as leaving instructions in a will, for example, adding a statement like, “I leave my dog, Baloo, to my brother Mike.” But know that Mike is now in charge of the dog and can take it to a shelter if he wants. That’s why it’s important for your clients to designate somebody who actually wants the pet.

Establish a pet trust. Philip Herzberg wrote in the August 2018 Journal that a pet trust may be more advantageous than a will. A pet trust “will enable your clients to appoint both a caregiver who will be responsible for the pet’s care and a trustee who will manage the funds for the pet’s well-being,” he wrote. Caring for pets is expensive. Have your clients figure out how much they spend on food, pet health care, medications, supplements, and supplies and fund the trust with that.

“Be sure clients name contingent caregivers and trustees in case their first choices are unable to serve in their respective roles,” Herzberg wrote.

Even though your clients may not leave millions to their pets, like Lagerfeld, they still should consider them in estate planning.

“Not everyone has millions to give their pet, but it shines a light on making sure there’s a qualified caretaker that you trust to ensure it has a good home to go to and also that you fund their needs,” Ma told CBS News.

Ana TL Headshot_Cropped

Ana Trujillo Limón is senior editor of the Journal of Financial Planning and the editor of the FPA Practice Management Blog. Email her at alimon@onefpa.org, or connect with her on LinkedIn

 


1 Comment

Conferences for Women Advisers on the Rise: Attend One

Over the past decade, the number of conferences geared toward the female adviser has grown. I’m proud to say that my own company, Commonwealth Financial Network®, will be holding its first Summit for Women Advisers in June. Further, broker/dealers, industry publications and industry organizations are focusing in on the female adviser to a much greater extent than ever before. So, what does this trend tell you?

For me, it means that many likely share my opinion that women will play a much greater role the industry at some point in the future. But I also believe that conferences for women advisers are on the rise in more ways than one.

Better Than Ever

It’s not just the quantity of conferences that has increased. It’s also the quality. The speakers are engaging, articulate, and, in some cases, well-known. Other presenters are delightful surprises, showcasing the inspiring new talent within the industry. And then there are the audiences! Audience members are well-spoken, asking insightful questions that everyone in the room can learn from.

The feeling of these events is also changing. Women seem to have gotten better at networking, evidenced by the constant exchange of business cards. And they’re branching out. You no longer see women sticking with the three or four people they came to the conference with. Instead, everyone is eager to put out a hand to meet new people.

Finally, those organizations creating these conferences are to be commended for taking a stand to help develop an adviser segment vital to the future of the industry. Organizers of successful events carefully include female advisers in designing events and diligently seek input from all attendees—so a round of enhancements can be made for the next conference.

Still Room for Improvement

Of course, some may say that we don’t need conferences for women advisers since there aren’t conferences just for men (that I know of). So, what’s with the focus on women? Well, the reality is that almost all conferences are dominated by men. Women advisers are still, by far, the minority at 17 percent, with the number of CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNERTM practitioners a bit higher at 23 percent. The female contingent has been far from top of mind over the years at industry conferences. If you need proof of that, just look at the standard gifts that advisers receive: the XXL T-shirt or golf tees. Those do work for some—but not for the majority—of women.

Sometimes, women are surprised to see men at a women’s conference. At one conference I attended, a couple of women commented on the number of men there. I had not paid attention and assumed they were from sponsoring organizations. But then I gave it some thought. Why didn’t the sponsor organizations send their female executives? Did those sponsor organizations even have female executives to send? As an industry, we are increasingly interested in ESG (environment, social and governance) investing. How might “governance” be playing out right in front of our eyes? Now, I’m sure some of those male attendees were sincerely interested in meeting the needs of female advisers on their staff. But for me, this experience highlighted the importance of increasing not just the number of female advisers, but also the number of woman-owned advisory firms. I believe conferences focused on women will help get us there.

Worth Your Time

The key takeaway here? If you attended a women’s conference once or twice years ago and weren’t overly impressed, I encourage you to give it another try. The quality of conferences for women has been greatly enhanced. I think you will find attending one an experience that is worth your time and energy. It might even boost your career.

Joni Youngwirth_2014 for web

Joni Youngwirth is managing principal of practice management at Commonwealth Financial Network in Waltham, Mass.


Leave a comment

On the Long Road to Retirement, Checkpoints are Key

Short-term actions yield short-term effect. This is especially true in financial education, where a recent report from the Pension Research Council at The Wharton School found that programs that follow up with participants or that operate continuously are most effective.

Our financial lives aren’t static; they change throughout the retirement saving process.

It may be time to evolve past a one-and-done education strategy in favor of planning that’s both consistent and dynamic.

According to the study, financial education programs that included follow-ups delivered to employees around the age of 40 optimally enhance savings by close to 10 percent at the time of retirement. Assuming a retirement age of 67, employees who have been followed up with since age 40 will have logged nearly 30 years of personalized education by the time they retire. That adds up to a lot of opportunities for plan sponsors to continue to support employees by engaging through tactics that work best for the particularities of the demographic involved—whether through videos, print materials, live sessions or even podcasts.

To paraphrase an old political phrase about voting, “educate early, educate often.” An employee who planned to retire at 65 but didn’t save enough may be hard to reach, especially late in his career. Our previously mentioned well-served mid-career employee is bound to be more willing to listen and learn. The key takeaway you can impart to your clients is to establish enthusiasm and confidence in retirees at the outset of the planning process, then build a strategy based on this solid foundation.

Bridging the Retirement Conversation Gap

More education is good, but a consistent schedule of relevant follow-ups is even better. For example, companies might improve their enrollment protocol by offering a week of employee presentations and meetings instead of one afternoon. That’s an important step, but it still overlooks the fact that planning can take decades. Typically, conversations about retirement take place during two periods. The first discussion happens when the worker is first hired and probably covers plan details and enrollment policies. The second may not occur until the worker is near retirement, at which point it’s a little late to make adjustments.

To keep the lines of communication open and flowing, advisers can add value to their plan sponsor clients by helping them maintain an ongoing and varied dialogue with their plan participants. Consider staggering the delivery of materials so the recipient doesn’t feel overwhelmed, and craft a follow-up game plan to suit personality types, schedules and status (newly enrolled, on track, running behind, nearing retirement).

Following up with participants may also mean checking in on general financial concerns such as daily living costs and paying down debt. Perhaps they’d like to receive advice about overall financial wellness as well as retirement. Even if they’re not quite on track after receiving guidance, in many cases they’ll still feel better after a chat.

Another opportunity to add value may arise when participants who initially don’t qualify for a contribution matching program become eligible later on. Whether or not the matching policy is clearly articulated by the employer—and in a perfect world, it always would be—your clients can enhance their service model by staying on top of eligibility along with other details.

Retirement planning is a long road for everyone involved—advisers, plan sponsors and, of course, the retirees themselves. You might think about emphasizing the importance of follow-ups by comparing them to friendly inns along the way: they provide the perfect opportunity for all parties to reflect on how far they’ve come and prepare for the next stage of the journey.

Learn more about retirement strategies and solutions through Janus Henderson Investors’ Defined Contribution program.

Editor’s note: This blog post originally appeared on the Janus Henderson Blog here.

Ben Rizzuto

Ben Rizzuto, CRPS®, is a retirement director for Janus Henderson Investors. In his position Rizzuto works with financial advisers, platform partners, Janus Henderson colleagues and clients to find solutions for today’s increasingly difficult retirement issues, whether they be within retirement plans or for those clients that are trying to figure out how to retire on their own terms. He also contributes to the dialogue surrounding these issues as the host of the “Plan Talk” podcast and through periodic posts to the Janus Henderson Blog.