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The Science of Systems: 3 Steps to Develop a System

As a financial adviser, it can be easy to lose sight of what you are doing during the day due to constant interruptions, market fluctuations and your regular day-to-day operations. Oftentimes the day unfolds, you get busy and before you know it, hours have passed. It’s important to take a moment or two each day to track what to-dos aren’t getting regularly accomplished or obstacles you are encountering and evaluate how effective your present systems are in handling them. Ask yourself, do you run your business or does your business run you?

Most financial advisers don’t take the time to analyze what I refer to as “the science of systems,” which defines that every task you do should have a system assigned to it and that all systems need to be constantly refined in order to produce consistent positive outcomes. The vast majority of advisers use a “wing it” approach, which is a recipe for disaster. In order to obtain your goals, you need to optimize your systems and not leave your business success up to mere chance.

Author Orison Swett Marden says, “A good system shortens the road to the goal.” But, what if you don’t have a system for creating systems? If so, use the following steps to develop any system.

Step 1: Determine Point “A”

Point “A” is simply a description of what you are currently doing or where you currently are in any particular facet of your business.

When I was a rookie adviser, I wanted to branch out and try seminars as one of my primary forms of prospecting. At that time, my Point “A” (current activity) was doing about three seminars a year—maximum. As a result, I was only earning a small percentage of my new business utilizing this form of prospecting. I had heard that other advisers in the office had built successful businesses via seminars, but I didn’t know how to manage an effective seminar system on a larger scale. I did, however, know that I needed help.

Step 2: Determine Point “B”

Point “B” can be described as where you want or would prefer to be. In other words, it’s your end goal.

In this case, my Point “B” was to have 10 seminars a year. That was a lofty goal, so I decided to find out what other successful advisers—both in my direct office and the company as a whole—were doing. Surprisingly, I found a few advisers who were reducing their overhead costs by offering their services to associations and corporations as a keynote speaker at their events. This gave me new insight into how to obtain my goal.

Step 3: Re-engineer the Steps

The final step is to map out an updated system. Ironically, what I have found with any system is that it’s best to actually begin with Point “B” in mind and map out the steps, but in reverse. Let me show you what I mean.

I knew that it took, on average, about six weeks from start to finish to market, coordinate and plan to put on a seminar. So I grabbed a calendar and circled all the first Tuesdays of a month, excluding the three summer months and December. That left me with eight seminar dates. Next, I backtracked what specific items I needed to be sure had to happen in weeks five, four, three, two and one, and I put those into my contact management system. Then, I determined that on some weeks I had to work simultaneously on various steps for multiple seminars, since there was overlap with back-to-back months. In addition, I added in prospecting to associations and corporations to see if they needed a keynote speaker so that I could add at least two additional seminars during the year for free. Lastly, I set up my time to work on my seminar system to be at the same time each week so nothing slipped through the cracks. I did 10 seminars that year.

Why the Science of Systems Works

The reason why the “science of systems” works is because you have a repeatable process for attaining goals. I realize that this line of reasoning may sound simple—and in essence it is. We tend to make things harder for ourselves when simple solutions exist.

If you would like a free coaching session, email Melissa Denham, director of client servicing.

 

Dan Finley

Daniel C. Finley is the president and co-founder of Advisor Solutions, a business consulting and coaching service dedicated to helping advisers build a better business.


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3 Steps to Captivating Content

You know captivating content when you see it. It’s something that causes an emotional response and resonates with you. It creates a connection, and makes you say, “I want to be part of that, and share with everyone I know!”

Captivating content is the mass email you get and look forward to. It’s the Super Bowl commercial everyone re-watches at work the next day. It’s the tagline you repeat. It’s the picture you print out. It’s the product you buy because of the package. Though it’s easy to identify, captivating content is generally not easy to create, but here are three things you can do to help get you there:

1.) Know Your Objective

What is the purpose of your content, and what do you hope to achieve with it? Obviously, you’re trying to generate more income, but how? Are you targeting current clients to invest more assets, or refer someone to you, or build a relationship with their family? Are you targeting prospects you’ve met or prospects you haven’t encountered? Are you trying to bring more people to your website or attain more email addresses?

List out each goal you’re trying to accomplish with each piece of content. It not only helps you create a clear message, but will also create a benchmark to track your success. Without an objective, how will you know if your message is working?

2.) Know Your Demographic

Who are you trying to reach with your content? Stay-at-home moms? Busy CEOs? Retired veterans? Married couples with grandchildren?

Figure out exactly who it is you want to see your content and make sure you’ve written and designed it to their preferences. For example, if you’re targeting an audience in their 60s, you’ll want to make sure the font you are using is large and clearly legible.

Knowing who you are targeting also helps you know where to place your content. Let’s say you were trying to reach the employees at the Nissan factory in your city. You could advertise on the billboard near the Nissan factory that they drive past every morning.

3.) Run It Past Someone Else

When you’re trying to come up with content ideas, it always helps to brainstorm with someone else with an outside perspective. It’s easy to get lost in the jargon and to take for granted the financial terms and knowledge you have. Financial concepts that seem juvenile to you may be foreign to someone outside of your field. That’s why it’s always important to get a second set of eyes on your work from someone who isn’t familiar with the ins and outs of your job.

To bring it all together, here’s an example of what it looks like:

Objective: Schedule meetings with prospective clients who need help managing their finances as they go through a divorce.

Demographic: Women going through a divorce or just recently divorced.

Content: An educational piece provided to local “divorce care” classes about the common financial mistakes that get overlooked after a divorce and how to avoid them with an invitation to reach out to your team for further help or to review their current plan.

Review and refine: Ask a client or spouse to review what you have for anything that doesn’t make sense then redesign or rewrite accordingly.

While we can’t promise that following these steps will guarantee you will be a viral sensation, we can promise that you’ll be closer to your goal than when you started.

For more tips on creating content and marketing visit KalliCollective.com, which is part of the FPA Member Discount Program.

Kalli Lipke

With nearly a decade of experience in the financial industry, along with securities licenses 7 & 63, Kalli Lipke not only understands the way your clients think, but how the financial industry operates. She helps financial planners bring their business to the next level through marketing and branding.


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Three Ways to Address the Lack of Adviser Diversity

The financial advice profession is objectively one of the least diverse professions in the United States. Many of us in the advice industry are painfully aware of this from an anecdotal perspective; one only needs to attend almost any industry function and simply scan the room for it to be clear.

The actual statistics are even more sobering. Of the more than 83,000 CFP® professionals in the U.S., less than 3.5 percent are black or Latino. Women enjoy somewhat better representation, at 23 percent. However, once you look at all advisers, not just CFPs, women only make up 16 percent of the total, and the black and Latino representation among all advisers is almost infinitesimal.

The reality is that advisers are a fairly homogenous bunch. With some exceptions, the average adviser is a 50-year-old white male, who likely began his career as a broker or insurance salesperson. In fact, the largest cohort of advisers is between the ages of 45-54. According to U.S. Census Bureau data, however, the average American is a woman, with a median age of 37, who makes around $47,000 annually. She also happens to live in a city (and leans Democratic, for what that’s worth).

Meanwhile, America, already a diverse nation, is becoming even more diverse. The Census Bureau projects that the U.S. will become a minority majority nation by 2043. Non-Hispanic whites will still be the largest single group, but no one group of people will have the majority. The implications of this should serve as a wake-up call to our profession. We need to be prepared to better serve the retirement planning needs of a much broader swath of Americans in the future. And it’s important to note that retirement planning needs have changed significantly, as most Americans no longer have pension plans to sustain them in retirement, and the median income is $60,000.

As such, these Americans are mostly unprepared for retirement, unfamiliar with investing and underserved from an advisory point of view. The Center for Retirement Research calculates a measure of retirement readiness, the National Retirement Risk Index (NRRI), which reports that 50 percent of Americans are at risk of declining living standards in retirement. These are people who desperately need to save for retirement, and currently have little in retirement savings. The majority of Americans need behavioral coaching around saving, financial planning and even basic personal finance assistance. There is most definitely a market for this type of advice; however, the reality is that this type of advice will not be anywhere near as lucrative as the high-net-worth individuals many advisers pursue today.

Coincident with the above is the fact that there happens to be fairly significant demographic changes taking place within the wealth management space. Almost 40 percent of advisers are expected to retire in the next 10 years, according to Cerulli Associates. Combined with the fact that over the next 20 years we will experience “the great wealth transfer”—the migration of assets from baby boomers to their heirs (most of whom do not currently have advisers) by 2022—the U.S. wealth management industry is likely to face a shortfall of at least 200,000 advisers.

The advisory practice of tomorrow is going to be very different than that of today. And the systemic changes described above just might help position the industry for the changes that I believe are necessary, including:

  1. Advisers becoming much less sales- and investing-oriented, and instead looking and feeling more like financial counselors, deploying soft skills such as emotional intelligence, empathy and compassion.
  2. Practices pivoting away from being profit-oriented toward being client-oriented.
  3. The profession embracing diversity and inclusion among advisers.

The question is how, and what are the practical steps we need to take in the meantime, as an industry, to ensure a more diverse adviser population positioned to serve an increasingly diverse population?

Recruit and Hire Purposefully

Too often, we hire from a rather closed network of friends and family, or even friends of friends and family, which directly contributes to the homogeneous culture we have today. Instead, we must make a conscious, purposeful decision to hire diverse candidates, and this commitment must come from the top and permeate the organization. Recruiting from historically black universities and colleges is a great start. Targeting appropriate affinity groups, professional networks and community associations is another way to identify diverse candidates.

Closely tied to a firm’s recruiting efforts is the overall messaging of the firm, which also needs to be consistent with a commitment to diversity and inclusion. Candidates will naturally review advisory firm websites, social media and communications before deciding to accept an offer, so firms need to ensure all internal and external communications and images align with the core commitment to diversity and inclusion.

Education is important, as well. Oftentimes, college and high school students simply do not realize that financial planning is a career option, or if they do, they view it as a hard-charging, Wall Street-type of role. It is critical for high schools and universities to offer classes in financial planning and/or financial literacy, and for industry leaders to do their part in enabling success for the next generation with programs such as the Envestnet Institute on Campus.

Rethink the Advisory Business Model

Technology must be incorporated in all areas of advisers’ practices in order to address the changing industry. From client acquisition and onboarding to aggregation to online meetings and scheduling, even elements of investment management. These practices will need to be automated in order for advisers to scale their practices and take on additional (perhaps lower margin) business. Independent RIAs with advanced technology integration generate around 50 percent more financial plans and investment proposals compared to their peers that don’t benefit from advanced integration. According to Envestnet-sponsored research from the Aite Group, this increased advice activity translates into a greater number of clients served by the practices (57 percent more), larger books of business (78 percent larger) and greater practice revenue/production (46 percent greater).

As many elements of the traditional advisory business model become commoditized, such as trading, asset allocation and even security selection, advisers must concentrate their efforts on higher-value—and more impactful—activities. They must do more with less and segment their clients appropriately. They must move away from providing advice on investments, and toward advice on life events, long-term goal planning, financial planning and relationship management. Everything else that is or has become commoditized must be automated.

For the more diverse adviser of tomorrow, this means supporting the industry’s move toward holistic financial wellness—an approach that incorporates all aspects of wealth management with less of a focus on pure investment management. Rather than relying on a data-driven approach to the handling of money, an increasingly diverse population of clients prefer a deeper focus on life goals for themselves and their families. This shift will attract advisers who care more about making financial wellness a reality and who respect the differences in communication styles when it comes to helping clients reach their goals.

Modify Compensation Approach

The way advisory firms are structured today from a compensation standpoint provides a self-selecting mechanism for hiring talent, which also contributes to the current lack of diversity. On the matter of hiring and onboarding practices, there is an emphasis on bringing in candidates who already have a strong network of potential clients. In fact, a vast majority of hiring professionals (86 percent) are looking for prospects who can bring in clients right away, according to CFP Board research.

This has a twofold effect of bringing into the firm primarily sales-focused individuals, and discouraging candidates who do not have friends and family with substantial-enough savings. Instead, firms can institute a team-based salary and bonus framework that would incentivize service, client retention and bringing in any new business, not just large books of business.

With a compensation strategy that includes a team-based incentive, firms reward everyone involved in the client relationship, with a scaled reward structure based on the level of personal contribution. That way, the need for financial security for all team members is addressed, and the team is motivated to work together and deliver strong results.

Conclusion

There are both aspirational and practical reasons to champion diversity. We should want every industry, including wealth management, to be diverse, because it’s simply the right thing to do. But also, countless studies have shown that diversity—of culture, gender, race, background, thought and more—objectively leads to better outcomes across the board. In order to ensure our industry thrives amid all the changes ahead, we must all do our part to enable and create a diverse, vibrant workforce.

Estee Jimerson

Estee Jimerson is the managing director, head of asset manager distribution at Envestnet.