Two Ways Planners Can Increase Their Value Proposition

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A recent study by Capgemini revealed that, despite robust portfolio returns, only 55.5 percent of high-net-worth investors feel a strong connection to their planners. If returns are on the rise, then where are planners falling flat?

We have recently experienced one of the longest bull markets in history (which despite recent market events, experts say is not yet at its end), and not only have investors been used to steady returns, they have continued to move toward indexing to get those returns at a lower cost. The reality is that investor satisfaction is less about market returns and more about the entire value the financial planner provides. The financial services profession is as impacted by technology, demographics and value provided as any other economic sector.

If you don’t continue to evolve your business model by creating more value for customers, you won’t sustain growth or even achieve the same level of success. However, some planners are resistant to making the changes necessary to enhance their business model and increase the loyalty of their clients because their existing model is what made them successful in the first place.

Our profession continues to be dominated by baby boomer planners, who are generally more resistant to adopting integrated technologies that can provide scale to their business and greater freedom to focus on client acquisition and relationships. Generation X and millennial planners, on the other hand, are proactively seeking out new technologies and ways to achieve stronger connections with their clients.

Planners who focus only on asset allocation as a core competency are most likely falling short of the broader value clients now expect and are willing to pay for. To improve their business models, planners should consider the following:

1.) Emphasize financial planning aimed at providing economic wellness, fulfillment and confidence—and the risk-adjusted strategies that can help clients get there.

While asset allocation is a key component of the wealth management process, it shouldn’t stand on its own as a planner’s core value proposition. Planners must shift their perspective and offer clients what they’re really looking for.

The need for value-add services, such as estate and tax planning, is being driven by the impending “Great Wealth Transfer,” as roughly $30 trillion is expected to switch hands from baby boomers to their heirs over the next 30 to 40 years, according to Accenture. Right now, most of these assets still rest with baby boomers but they are increasingly transitioning to spouses, Generation X and millennials.

Getting younger investors in the doors of your business starts with understanding how they view money. Remember that since many newer investors acutely felt the impact of the Great Recession at a formative period in their lives, they may have a greater emotional attachment to money than their parents. This has manifested as a strong tendency toward risk avoidance and a desire to focus on maintaining wealth rather than growing it.

Planners should therefore offer services and counsel that cater to this mindset, relating to clients on a personal level rather than just finding an appropriate asset allocation.

2.) Adopt and implement the types of financial technologies that investors are demanding in order to track their wealth.

As predicted, the advent of robo-advisers did not put financial planners out of business, but this technology has opened an important dialogue about the value a planner provides to the modern investor.

We live in an age when on-demand services like Amazon Prime and Uber have become the new normal, and financial services are no exception. Investors today want constant access to their accounts, so planners risk extinction if they continue to manage client relationships with a yellow pad and quarterly phone calls. Modern clients demand a digital portal where they can easily access their money and your advice 24-7.

Many planners are hesitant to adopt this technology because they fear it will diminish the need for their role, but that couldn’t be further from the truth. Clients might enjoy the ease of access a portal provides for quickly updating beneficiary designations, but when faced with a significant event like a death in the family, they will turn to you for professional guidance. No computer will ever be able to provide trusted counsel for complicated personal scenarios.

As a planner, understand that your greatest value-add may not be having a hand in every single touchpoint of your business. In fact, planners who focus on listening and serving the overall financial well-being of their clients, while delegating non-essential tasks to technology, will build the stronger connections necessary to increase client satisfaction.

James Poer.jpg

As president and chief executive officer of Kestra Financial, James Poer is dedicated to helping independent financial advisers fulfill client goals through a unique integration of technology and service. Kestra Financial serves independent financial advisory firms with varying business affiliations, including independent registered investment advisers (RIAs) and hybrid advisers.

One thought on “Two Ways Planners Can Increase Their Value Proposition

  1. James, great article. Covers all the specific challenges planners entail with their clients. One specific area that isn’t discussed is what we have created called “Reverse Standby Strategy” or the use of a reverse mortgage for individuals with a large amount of equity to supplement their income during their retirement. As we know the market for equity investments will increase and decrease over time. How does someone contemplating retirement, recently retired or retired for some time grasp the concept of having to supplement their income. The benefit for the planner is the ability to keep their AUM steady. If you’re interested in a further discussion, we would welcome your review and input.

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